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Archive for the ‘Maine Life’ Category

This President’s weekend didn’t find me entertaining/hiding from vacationing college students or high school students. I was not elbow-deep in spackle from the winter home reno project. (I should have been, but I wasn’t.) Instead, I found myself with no necessary tasks on the Sunday of President’s weekend, and so I minced across the ice-skating rink formerly known as Driveway, got into the car with imprudently dressed Husband (sneakers for the snow and ice?), and we drove to South Bristol.

Every Sunday of President’s Weekend, the Thompson Ice house has its annual ice harvesting. The ice on the pond is cut into blocks of ice 12” thick, about 2×3’, and according to one of the men pushing the blocks up a ramp, about 250-300 pounds. As the event begins at 9 a.m. and ends at 4, I suspect that the ice blocks weigh 250 pounds in the morning, and weigh 300+ pounds at the end of the day! The ice is stacked into the ice house, with sawdust and hay above and below, “to the depth of a tyne.”

This was a commercial enterprise from 1826 until 1985. The building was deemed unsafe, but rather than sell the business on the open market, the house, property, pond, and dam were designated as a museum to preserve traditional ice harvesting. And visitors every year are grateful for this gift.

We arrived late morning, on one of those spectacular Maine days, when the white snow and blue sky compete for attention:

Landscape_Horiz

Here is the scene that greeted us: a motorized saw cutting grid lines into the ice, recently freed rectangles of ice floating free, and delighted visitors.

FloatRectPeopleSnowSpray

One of the young ones trying his hand at manually sawing the ice into blocks:

BoySaws_Still

The grid lines are precise:

Grid_Scored

A close-up of a floating block of ice:

Close_FloatingBlock

And of the floating rectangles:

FloatingRectangles

The first area of the pond to be carved into ice is the chute that leads to the ramp that leads to the ice house. Lining the chute are happy volunteers, mostly the kids, who man the long tools to encourage the blocks to float towards the ramp:

HappyBoy_IceChute

When the ice blocks touch the ramp, they are guided onto a simple wooden frame that guides them up out of the water and onto the ramp:

1GuideIceBlockOntoRamp

The block moves up the ramp until the floor of the ramp drops away,

2BlockGoesUpRamp

and the block tips forward and down, and slides into the ice house:

3BlockDropsOntoSlide

There is a gang of young men in cleated boots that greet the ice block with loud oofs and hollers, and they guide the block into its new home. When the day ends, the ice house will be filled to the rafters with enormous blocks of ice.

Then what? The ice is sold by the block or chipped, and a good bit of it supplies an ice cream party for the community in July. Good deal!

SaleSign

There was a small shed with a movie playing that described the history of the ice house, Thompson Ice House coffee mugs and sweatshirts were for sale, as were hot dogs and baked beans. I opted for the beans, and held the hot cup of amazingly sugary beans in my hands … I watched the ice chips fly into the air, listened to the dropped “r’s” of my neighbahs, and appreciated where I live.

 

WORDS FROM OTHERS

“Maine is a joy in the summer. But the soul of Maine is more apparent in the winter.”

Paul Theroux, American novelist (1941- )

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The seedling was a Pierpont, and its parent weighed-in at a whopping 1,196 pounds. And sometime within its first 24 hours in my garden, in the dark of night, a villain stole in, dug in the rich soft dirt, and killed the seedling. Pierpont is gone.

 

MH the Grower (formerly blogged about as Michael Horst) responded: “It is what it is.” And he gamely went back to the Pinkham Plantation nursery…

 

MH_Seedling_Greenhouse

 

…and selected one of the few remaining seedlings left. A Powell, this time. And one whose parent weighed 1,548. A more impressive lineage and perhaps the reward for perseverance.

 

MH_Powell1548

 

Another reward for this second attempt was that I was present to document The Planting in complete, possibly excruciating, detail. Let’s start with The Digging of the Hole:

 

MH_digsHole

 

Note the incredibly dark rich organic compost that will be the home of this lucky Powell 1548. (I like naming it that. Alpha + Numeric = the pumpkin version of an R2D2 or a C3PO.)

 

The hole was dressed with a fertilizer called Bio-Starter, an organic multi-component mix that includes mycorhizzae, a beneficial fungi. Those little white bits? Evidence of the addition of Bio-Starter. Let there be no doubt.

 

The Hole

 

Next, one modest tablespoon of Superthrive, mixed with a full gallon of water. Superthrive is a hormone-type plant growth stimulator. Trust that MH the Grower is not interested in cultivating an “Oh, isn’t that a cute little pumpkin!” No, he’s going for a Powell 1548 – an Atlantic Giant. A monster. This is, after all, an entry into the Pumpkinfest Weigh-Off in October, so there’s no messing around. Superthrive it is.

 

WaterHormone

 

And in it goes, a robust healthy pumpkin seedling with its first set of true leaves, one of which is large and points in the direction that the main stem wants to grow.

 

MH_PlacesSeedling_Hole

 

And my dog MacKenzie watched from afar, content to be near all of us, happy that she’d found some shade, and not quite certain what all the fuss was about.

 

Plant_MacInBack

 

MH paid full attention to this leaf and its demonstration of intent. The seedling was planted with the leaf facing the greatest area of open space in the reserved portion of the garden. That vine will have nothing in its way for at least 20 feet. For the purpose of humor, I wish the seedling was facing west, but it isn’t. It’s facing north, and so I must say, “Go north, young seedling! Go north!”

 

Here’s a photo of the open area, the wide wilderness that the Powell 1548 will explore:

 

TheRange

 

Because this was a do-over, the decision was made to protect the seedling from nighttime marauders. I offered my stash of tomato cages, but that proved both ineffective and silly. MH decided that four stakes, a roll of chicken wire, a length of rope, and a recently unearthed brick would do the trick. Here’s the entire sequence:

 

StakesInstead

StakesInPlace

CircleWithWire

TieWithRope

 

And the result:

 

Caged

 

This photo is comforting to MH and myself, and we hope it is deeply disturbing to the assassins of the night, the ones that care not for infant pumpkins and care more for the grubs, worms, and other burrowing creatures they are certain reside deep in the compost. They will not get the chance to try again. The Powell 1548 is caged. For a day or two, at least. That baby’s gonna grow, and FAST.

 

Stand back, and stay tuned.

 

WORDS FROM OTHERS:

“It’s not how many times you get knocked down that count, it’s how many times you get back up.”

 

— George A. Custer, Cavalry Commander (1839 – 1876)

 

 

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And so it begins, another rollicking edition of the Damariscotta Pumpkinfest & Regatta, and I am more than just a delighted spectator this year. I made a grand bargain with neighbor and friend Michael Horst: I’m giving him a sunny 20’ section of my garden and he’s giving me permission to blog about this enterprise to my heart’s content. And, whose heart wouldn’t be content to follow the progress of the growing of an Atlantic Giant pumpkin?!

 

This event involves the entire community. Adults and children volunteer to grow the pumpkins. The pumpkins are grown and then weighed, prize money is awarded, the pumpkins are deployed throughout the town, and artists decorate them with wild abandon and enthusiasm. Some people turn their giant pumpkins into boats fitted with outboard motors and race them in the harbor. (That’s the “Regatta” part of the event.) Businesses and non-profits support the event, sponsor the artists, organize parades, hire street musicians, arrange for giant slingshots to hurl pumpkins great distances, and set up giant cranes to drop pumpkins from great heights. It is a lively time.

 

Pumpkinfest takes place over Columbus Day weekend, but let’s not get ahead of ourselves. This past Sunday was “Seedling Sunday”, when 600 Atlantic Giant pumpkin seedlings were given away to Squashbucklers (formerly known as “Volunteer Growers”). The seedlings were distributed at Pinkham’s Plantation, a local nursery, and the Squashbucklers were also given growing instructions and five gallons of compost to give the tiny plants a healthy start.

 

Sponsors of the event were present, including the Maine Maritime Museum that arrived in this audacious ride:

LobsterCar_WithSign

 

LobsterCar_HeadOn

 

Other notables included representatives from the sponsoring Farnsworth Art Museum, the Boothbay Railway Village, and local media personalities.

 

The real draw for the Squashbucklers, though, was the lure of the seedlings and the expert guidance of the Pumpkin Posse, the volunteers who assist in every phase of this 6-month long event.

 

PumpkinPosse_Sign

 

Here is what greeted Michael as he entered the greenhouse:

 

Banner_left

PickUpTent_LongShot
 

The seedlings are donated by the previous year’s growers, who are ferociously proud of their hefty pumpkins and the genetics that produced them. Each seedling is marked with the grower’s name and the weight of the pumpkin from which the seeds were harvested.

 

Much like a champion racehorse, you can select your seedling by its breeding and its trainer (grower). This seedling was grown by Powell, and came from a monster weighing 1,355 pounds.

Seedling-_Powell

 

My friend selected a “Gabourey” seedling, and a “Pierpont” seedling, which was grown by last year’s winner of both the Pumpkinfest weigh-off AND set a new record for the state of Maine at 1,727.5 pounds. Michael’s “Pierpont” seedling came from a pumpkin that weighed 1,196 pounds. An impressive bloodline, for sure.

 

Seedling_Pierpont

 

He was instructed by an expert about what to watch for in Vine Direction. The orientation of the fruit to the vine is critical. More on that later.

 

Mike_Expert_2

 

Michael prepared the planting site in my garden. It has been dug, de-rocked, and a half-yard of fluffy, gorgeous black organic compost is now in place. Soon either the Gabourey or the Pierpont seedling will be planted.

 

Stay tuned! This blog will carry photos and commentary on all aspects of this particular seedling’s moment in the sun.

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PumpkinFest 2015

It’s that time of year again, when the streets of Damariscotta are filled with parents, children, and giant decorated pumpkins!  It is a crowded, noisy, cheerful celebration of autumn, and I just love it!

Here are a few photos of the pumpkins on Main Street.  Note:  This is just a cross-section — there were pumpkins on side streets and in far-flung corners of town that I just didn’t have time to get to.  But this selection will give you an idea of what everyone in town enjoyed!

Sometimes the art was more about assembly than painting or carving. This is a lobster rendered in pumpkins.

Sometimes the art was more about assembly than painting or carving. This is a lobster rendered in pumpkins.

Over the rainbow, or over the pumpkin?!

Over the rainbow, or over the pumpkin?!

A minion atop a crowded phone booth. Baffling message but interesting concept.

A minion atop a crowded phone booth. Baffling message but interesting concept.

One of my favorites this year: a hermit crab.

One of my favorites this year: a hermit crab.

Frida Kahlo.

Frida Kahlo.

An ice cream cone outside the local soda fountain.

An ice cream cone outside the local soda fountain.

Another one of my favorites: a chickadee!

Another one of my favorites: a chickadee!

A Halloween witch?

A Halloween witch?

PFest_15_HideYourFace

Glen Chadbourne, of Stephen King-bookjacket fame, had a little baby crawling into his pumpkin this year -- suitably creepy!

Glen Chadbourne, of Stephen King-bookjacket fame, had a little baby crawling into his pumpkin this year — suitably creepy!

My vote for Best Pumpkin this year.

My vote for Best Pumpkin this year.

Mother Goose: The cow jumped over the moon!

Mother Goose: The cow jumped over the moon!

Monarchs.

Monarchs.

A spider atop the flowers.

A spider atop the flowers.

Carved alewives, overlooking the Damariscotta River.

Carved alewives, overlooking the Damariscotta River.

Flounders.

Flounders.

A lobster purse complete with zipper!

A lobster purse complete with zipper!

Swimming seals!

Swimming seals!

Paddling!

Paddling!

Sunflower.

Sunflower.

I’m looking forward to next year.  I’m hoping to be one of the Volunteer Growers, contributing my own giant pumpkin to the cause, and….possibly working with Husband on crafting our own pumpkin for the festival? Stay tuned!

WORDS FROM OTHERS:

“I would rather sit on a pumpkin and have it all to myself, than be crowded on a velvet cushion.”

— Henry David Thoreau

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It is a world of imagination, where dreams come true. Where you appreciate the past, look forward to tomorrow, and fill your life with color, form, and fantasy.

Disneyland?   Nope. This magic kingdom is the annual Fedco Tree Sale in Clinton, Maine. If you’re a gardener, this event makes Disneyland pale. Yes, it is that good. Here is how I spent my day in Disneyland – I mean, in the Fedco warehouse:

It started with my placing an order for perennials in the last dark months of 2014. I ordered two roses, 6 yarrow, 3 echinacea, 10 liatris, 6 hollyhocks, 3 lavenders, and 6 butterfly weed. This was a separate order from the seed order I’d placed with Fedco a few weeks earlier. The seeds came to my local food co-op, as they offered their members the opportunity to place a group order and so receive a discount. The idea that a $1.50 packet of seeds required a further discount was almost laughable – but I have learned that Maine and its businesses often surprise me in the nicest way. So I accepted the additional discount with this group order and sent up yet another silent “thank you” to Fedco.

This perennial order was not part of the group order. I could have had the plants shipped to me, but I knew I wouldn’t be ready to put them in the ground for the April delivery. I opted to drive 70 minutes to Clinton to pick them up at the warehouse. What a happy choice that turned out to be!

The day before our planned trip, I received a call from a woman in the warehouse. She wanted to remind me that my order was ready for pick-up, and that I could only come that Friday or Saturday. I said I was counting the minutes until Friday morning, and she laughed. The morning of the pick-up, my GPS wrestled with me, and told me that despite the address on my order pick-up form, the warehouse was NOT in Waterville. Husband suspected it was in Clinton. I called the warehouse to ask if that was true. It was. I told the woman on the phone that I would be there at 10:58. (GPS is nothing if not precise) She laughed. It seems that everyone that works for Fedco is happy.

I had a pleasant drive with Husband on that sunny cool Friday morning in May. As we exited the highway, I saw the blue warehouse, with the huge “SALE” sign out front. We were waved into the parking lot by this gentleman. Sorry kids, but he was much more appealing to me than Mickey. He works for Fedco, and so naturally he was happy:

Fedco_SombreroMan

We pulled into the parking lot…

Fedco_WarehouseEntrance

…,and entered Disneyland for Gardeners. The air was cold in the warehouse and it smelled like wood and green leaves. The first sight was of wheelbarrows filled with damp sawdust, customers waiting patiently holding bare-root fruit trees, and workers wrapping those trees in the sawdust and clear plastic. (And note the milk jug “scoops” in the sawdust — Fedco uses milk jugs creatively. Read on to learn more.) The reason for the long line of customers: the fruit trees were offered at 2 for the price of 1.

Fedco_WrapTreesBetter

Now THIS is a shopping aisle that speaks to me:

Fedco_FruitTreeAisle

There were several areas for shopping. The first was the open warehouse with trees, roses, and shrubs. There was an interior room with small tables and small boxes filled with treasure. One table held tea, garlic, oils, and smudge sticks — hyssop and sage wound with bright string.

Fedco_BowlofGarlic

Even the signage in this room was true Fedco: The illustration was happy! Who needs Minnie Mouse? I had this gal:

Fedco_SelfServiceSign

I found medicinal herbs that I’d only read about and have never seen, such as black cohosh, and plants that frequently appear in literature, such as Solomon’s Seal:

Fedco_SolomonSealSign

Asclepias incarnata? You are indeed the personification of milkweed:

Fedco_AsclepiasSign

An outside area had more perennials, and yet another use for milk jugs:

Fedco_AppleMintJugs

Despite having already placed an order for roses and perennials, Husband encouraged me to go into their greenhouse, and I emerged with 4 hot pepper plants for him, and three varieties of thyme for me.

Back into the warehouse, we found grape vines, and Husband immediately made plans for the stand of Nuisance Sumacs (I have just made that an official variety) in our yard. I think he dreams of being a vintner.

Fedco_GrapesSign

I picked up my order, feeling like I’d taken every ride at Disneyland without waiting in any long lines, feeling like I’d emerged from a gift shop with something way better than a Tinker Bell necklace, and feeling once again that I much preferred the company of Mainers to that of really really big stuffed animals. I was happy.

On the way out, we saw this beautiful wreath on the wall. Made of plant labels and a plastic wrap bow, it was the sign pointing me to my own personal World of Tomorrow – a bountiful garden filled with blooms, pollinators, and charmed visitors. I’m working on making it the Happiest Place on Earth. Thank you (again!), Fedco.

Fedco_LabelWreath

WORDS FROM OTHERS

“Here you leave today and enter the world of yesterday, tomorrow and fantasy.”

–Plaque above the bridge as you enter the Main Street of Disneyland

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Oh, how I wish this WERE a fable. But it’s not. It’s a true story of yet another victim of the winter of 2014-15. The story goes like this:

The former owner of our house was quite a gardener. She planted lovely perennials, trees, and shrubs, and very few of them were to my liking. (But to be fair, she didn’t plant them for me.) I am living with most of her choices because I do recognize her skill, and the health and vigor of the plants. This includes two dwarf Japanese maples (acer palmatum) that flank the driveway-side of our house.

These two trees met the winter in a similar way: healthy and fully clothed in bark. But sometime, during a dark winter night before the first blizzard, a porcupine (erethizon doratum) started snacking on the bark of one tree. When the snow receded, the extent of the damage became clear. And I now know why this critter’s Latin name is so apt. “Erethizon doratum”? Your translated name is “quill pig” and that’s about how I’m feeling towards you right now.

Witness:

The one maple tree that survived unchewed:

RedMaple_Safe

And the stripped maple tree that was far enough from the doorway to escape our notice so that the cowardly rodent could pig-out:

RedMaple_Chewed

Here is a close-up of a chewed branch. Note the teeth marks:

RedMaple_ChewedBranch

Am I upset? You betcha. But perhaps not for the reason you imagine. Husband is very very upset that we have lost a beautiful tree. Me? Not about that. Remember, this wasn’t my favorite inherited planting. I’m more upset that we have a porcupine close to our house and to our two dogs.

I am not alone in my dismay about these prickly beasts. They have been referenced by comedians, poets, and Communist leaders alike, and all seem to agree: These are tough customers. Two more quotes to accompany my “Words from Others” widget:

“If you start throwing hedgehogs under me, I shall throw a couple of porcupines under you.”

  • Nikita Khrushchev (Russian politician, 1894-1971)

“The porcupine, whom one must handle gloved, may be respected, but never loved.”

  • Arthur Guiterman (American writer and poet, 1871-1943)

Lest you think that I am a heartless, unfeeling porcupine hater, I will share two facts with you that prove that even porcupines are creatures that a mother could love (a Quill Pig mother, I mean).

Fact #1: Baby porcupines are called “porcupettes.” (awww)

Fact #2: A baby porcupine’s quills are ready to use 20 minutes after they are born. (It is that 20-minute delay that earns them a mother’s love.)

The snow has finally retreated, and the full extent of this winter’s damage is known. I’m hoping this is the last hurrah for our porcupine neighbor. If I have to write a blog about rushing our dogs to the vet in the middle of the night for Quill Removal, you can bet I will not be including any cute facts about these little prickly pigs at the end of that post.

WORDS FROM OTHERS:

“I’m a little hoarse tonight. I’ve been living in Chicago for the past two months, and you know how it is, yelling for help on the way home every night. Things are so tough in Chicago that at Easter time, for bunnies, the little kids use porcupines.”

— Fred Allen, (Comedian, 1894-1956)

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My 8 x 8′ Dream

When Husband and I decided to move to Maine, I was thrilled in every way. Beautiful scenery, lower cost of living, the pervasive atmosphere of New England common sense, seafood, and best of all, no humidity. And as Husband is an artist, our move to a lively arts community in midcoast Maine made all the sense in the world. However, friends and family were worried about my potential for happiness here, for one reason alone: the shorter growing season. As an avid gardener, it was assumed that my moving from Zone 6 to Zone 5 would break my heart.

Not a chance. First, I am a four-season gardener. I plant, I grow, I preserve, and I press flowers. I do a lot of reading about gardening. So a growing season that was truncated on both ends held no regret. We were moving to a town with a climate tempered by the ocean, and as I am particularly fond of hardy herbs and rugged roses, everything I wanted to grow was acclimated to the zone. So, I anticipated zero impact on my gardening activities.

Husband loves to indulge this passion. And so, despite our being on a strict we-just-moved budget, he presented me with an incredible gift for Mother’s Day: a greenhouse!

And not just any greenhouse. It was a Grandio Elite, with a “premium package.” (Intrigued?! Check out: http://www.grandiogreenhouses.com/

I held the brochure in my hands, and looked through the instructions for assembly. It was to be a beautiful structure of wavy corrugated walls, two windows that opened and closed on their own according to the temperature, and dark green metal framing. I was looking at 8 x 8’ of glory: planting seeds in the early spring, growing summer tomatoes safe from insects, reading in a dry warm place in the winter or during a rain storm, and I was looking at a room of my own. (Virginia Woolf never had it so good. In fact, if she’d had a greenhouse, I suspect she might have had a happier ending.)

The journey from a set of instructions to a finished structure took time, as it was just Husband doing the majority of the work, and me doing the toting, holding, and providing both inspiration and lunch, but it was always time well spent.

Here is what happened:

THE BASE

It started at the bottom, as most worthwhile enterprises do. The foundation was a big task, and as Husband is meticulous, this took a bit of time. He dug down 15 inches, laid one cubic yard of gravel (over 2,800 pounds) in the foundation and up to grade around the four 8 x 8’s of treated lumber. That bed of gravel, and those level sturdy beams were a beautiful sight.

GH_BaseJustLaid_Tools_1

Husband, an artist as well as a craftsman, used 6 cement blocks reclaimed from the overgrown garden out front to create a patio for the greenhouse. Ultimate purpose: a base for two garden chairs that we will use to gaze both inside the greenhouse and out to the flowering beds.

And so, the base had a foundation that was loose and porous, and a patio that was solid and sturdy. Once again, I was struck by the analogies between gardening and true love. While Husband and I have had our moments of shifting gravel, we always seem to find those nice solid places to rest and regroup.

Here is photo of me actually doing something more concrete than providing inspiration: I am screwing the base of the greenhouse to the timber foundation.

GH_AmyScrewsBase_2

Base laid, it was time to start on the assembly of the front wall.

GH_FrontWallFrameLayingOnBase_3

THE WALLS

Somehow, seeing the walls come together made this all real for me. The instructions couldn’t have been simpler, and even though the number of pieces was daunting, the labeling was good, and we just took it slowly.

One piece at time! Here is the peak of the front wall:

GH_FrontPeakOnFrame_0

This shows the front wall resting on the lush weeds. These weeds will, hopefully, be replaced by a bed of daisies and a border of winter savory, lady’s mantle, and hyssop edging the lovely rock ledges in the garden.

GH_FrontWallOnWeeds_1

Husband has the front wall in place. MacKenzie, the gentle girl, is sniffing for deer beyond the rock wall.

WillAssemblesTheGreenhouse_2

And – with the front and back walls in place, the day came to an end. The afternoon light in my garden is lovely, in every season.

GH_BackWallErected_Better_3

THE ROOF AND WINDOWS

Here comes the roof! Braces installed, coffee cup perpetually in the foreground, and ladders at the ready.

GH_RoofFramesErected_1

Which is prettier: that deep blue Maine sky, or those roof panels?

GH_RoofPanelsInstalled_2

Here come the windows. I confess I never dreamed my greenhouse would include windows that opened and closed on their own. Luxury! With two home businesses to run, and an enormous house to keep up, in addition to my two dogs, three kids, and large garden, having something take care of itself is…luxury.

GH_RoofWindowsInstalled_3

The eastern window – opens!

GH_EasternWindowOpens_4

As does the western window! Another good day comes to an end.

GH_WesternWindowOpens_5

COMPLETED

With the greenhouse completed, I spent a lot of time going in and out of the building, and smiling a LOT.

GH_HappyAmy

My beautiful greenhouse, in the setting sun. I have such plans for you!

GH_Completed_SunSetting

EPILOGUE

One happy construction day ended with me photographing the setting sun through the corrugated walls. The wavy view makes it look like I’m a much better photographer than I actually am. Bonus!

GH_ViewThroughWigglyWalls_1

Bonus #2: As soon as the walls were up, I moved a potted clematis indoors. The warmer climate inside encouraged the vine to bloom. I had my first blossom in the autumn! Double bonus!

ClematisOne_2

And, a few weeks after the greenhouse was completed, Husband presented me with a birthday gift to go along with my Mother’s Day gift: A seed-starting table. Double decker, and a triple bonus!

AssembledSeedTrayTable_3

I have ordered my seeds for the spring, and I am eagerly looking forward to starting them inside my greenhouse. I visit the greenhouse almost every day – shoveling through the drifts of snow to reach it, and I have always found the temperature warmer and the air moister than that outside. The dogs always accompany me in, and then look puzzled. “Why don’t we go back outside to play?” they seem to say. “There’s nothing here.”

I answer them, “That’s what you think. Just wait….”

WORDS FROM OTHERS

“Who loves a garden loves a greenhouse too.”

– William Cowper, English poet, 1731-1800

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